Photos

Photographer's Note

This is Bridalveil Fall, which is one of the most prominent waterfalls in the Yosemite National Park. Much to my disappointment, the place was bone dry and not a drop of water. I'm just wondering if this is the sign of times with global warming in the horizon. Anyway, Wikipedia describes the place as follows;

"Bridalveil Fall is 620 feet (188 m) tall and flows year round. The glaciers that carved Yosemite Valley left many hanging valleys which spawned the waterfalls that pour into the valley. All of the waterways that fed these falls carved the hanging valleys into steep cascades with the exception of Bridalveil Fall. Bridalveil still leaps into the valley from the edge of precipice, although that edge has moved back into an alcove from the original edge of the valley. Note that while Yosemite Falls seem to also fall into this category, the original course took the Yosemite Creek down a gorge to the west of its current location. The primary source of Bridalveil Falls is Ostrander Lake, some 10 miles to the south.

When the wind blows briskly, the waterfall will appear to be falling sideways. During lesser water flow the falls often don't reach the ground. Because of this, the Ahwahneechee Native Americans called this waterfall Pohono, which means Spirit of the Puffing Wind."

Photo Information
  • Copyright: Renier Figuracion (kiwi_explorer) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1834 W: 81 N: 2710] (12209)
  • Genre: Places
  • Medium: Color
  • Date Taken: 2007-11-06
  • Categories: Nature
  • Photo Version: Original Version
  • Date Submitted: 2007-12-14 16:08
Viewed: 2619
Points: 76
Discussions
Additional Photos by Renier Figuracion (kiwi_explorer) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1834 W: 81 N: 2710] (12209)
View More Pictures
explore TREKEARTH