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Photographer's Note

This wonderful tidal island is linked to mainland Britain by a wonderful causeway.
It has a fascinating History going back to the 8th Century of being a fortress, a priory, a harbour and a home.

Today: It has a resident James St Aubyn and his family. It is managed by the National Trust and if the tide is down you can walk the short walk to the Mount or if the tide is up there are regulary ferries.

What does Wiki Say:
It may have been the site of a monastery in the 8th - early 11th centuries and Edward the Confessor gave it to the Norman abbey of Mont Saint Michel.[6] It was a priory of that abbey until the dissolution of the alien houses by Henry V, when it was given to the abbess and Convent of Syon at Isleworth, Middlesex. It was a resort of pilgrims, whose devotions were encouraged by an indulgence granted by Pope Gregory in the 11th century.

The monastic buildings were built during the 12th century but in 1425 as an alien monastery it was suppressed.[7]

Henry Pomeroy captured the Mount, on behalf of Prince John, in the reign of Richard I. John de Vere, 13th Earl of Oxford, seized and held it during a siege of 23 weeks against 6,000 of Edward IV's troops in 1473. Perkin Warbeck occupied the Mount in 1497. Humphry Arundell, governor of St Michael's Mount, led the rebellion of 1549. During the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, it was given to Robert Cecil, Earl of Salisbury, by whose son it was sold to Sir Francis Basset. During the Civil War, Sir Arthur Basset, brother of Sir Francis, held the Mount against the parliament until July 1646.

In 1755 the Lisbon earthquake caused a tsunami to strike the Cornish coast over 1,000 miles away. The sea rose six feet in 10 minutes at St Michael's Mount, ebbed at the same rate, and continued to rise and fall for five hours. The 19th-century French writer Arnold Boscowitz claimed that "great loss of life and property occurred upon the coasts of Cornwall." [8]

In the late 19th century the skeleton of an anchorite was discovered when a chamber was found beneath the castle's chapel.[citation needed] When the anchorite died of illness or natural causes, the chamber was sealed off and became his tomb.[citation needed] The Mount was sold in 1659 to Colonel John St Aubyn. His descendant, Lord St Levan, continues to be the "tenant" of the Mount but has ceased to be resident there, his nephew, James St Aubyn, taking up residency and management of the Mount in 2004.

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Additional Photos by Rich Beghin (Ricx) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 994 W: 51 N: 2900] (13495)
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