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Photographer's Note

Viking stone ship burial ground Gettlinge, Öland, Sweden.
http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMEV2J_Gettlinge_land_Sweden
"Gettlinge is known for its impressive Viking stone ship burial ground. The Stone ship or ship setting was an early Germanic burial custom, characteristically Scandinavian but also found in Germany and the Baltic states. The grave or cremation burial is surrounded by tightly or loosely fit slabs or stones in the outline of a ship. They are often found in grave fields, but are sometimes far from any other archaeological remains.
Viking graves have also been found at the Hulterstad Gravefield as well as the extensive Strandvalle Gravfeld, both on Oland. These findings imply that Gettlinge was a link within a chain of Viking settlements concentrated on the southern coasts of Öland, although most Viking settlements were actually found on the southeast of Öland having better access to the open sea."
The following is an update to the note following responses from Gunnar and Gert about the ship being from before the age of the Vikings. I had blindly copied from a website that repeats material from Wikipedia. The website wrongly suggested that this was a viking stone ship. That seems to have been repeated across multiple websites.
A sign at the Gettlinger site said that the burial ground was in use for over 1000 years from the early Roman iron age well into the era of the vikings. From a bit of research across multiple websites it seems that stone ship burial sites in Scandinavia began in the late bronze age. I could not find clear reference tothe length of the period over which this practice took place but it seems that it could have continued into the age of the vikings. The beginning of the Viking Age is commonly given as 793, when Vikings pillaged the important British island monastery of Lindisfarne.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stone_ship
"The Stone ship or ship setting was an early Germanic burial custom, characteristically Scandinavian but also found in Germany and the Baltic states. The grave or cremation burial is surrounded by tightly or loosely fit slabs or stones in the outline of a ship. They are often found in grave fields, but are sometimes far from any other archaeological remains".
"Scattered examples are found in Northern Germany and along the coast of the Baltic States. Excavations have shown that they are usually from the latter part of the Nordic Bronze Age, c. 1000 BC - 500 BC (e.g. Gotland) or from the Germanic Iron Age, the Vendel Age and the Viking Age (e.g. Blekinge and Scania)."

It is interesting to view the extent of the site using Google Maps. The individual stones can be seen as well as patterns in the landscape which are associated with mounds and depressions.
56.388624, 16.434902

holmertz, joso, bukitgolfb301, bukitgolfb301, delpeoples, SnapRJW has marked this note useful

Photo Information
  • Copyright: Trevor Moffiet (trevormoffiet) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 212 W: 2 N: 578] (3112)
  • Genre: Places
  • Medium: Color
  • Date Taken: 2009-07-21
  • Categories: Ruins
  • Camera: OLYMPUS E30
  • Exposure: f/22, 1/80 seconds
  • More Photo Info: view
  • Map: view
  • Photo Version: Original Version
  • Date Submitted: 2012-12-06 2:52
Viewed: 4180
Points: 28
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