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Photographer's Note

North of Carramore lake, close to Barnatra village.
This location is not very far from Bangor Erris town
(south direction).

I must say that this region is scarcely populated.

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At the beginning of the 19th century the dominant industry of Ireland was agriculture. Large areas of this land was under the control of landowners living in England. Much of this land was rented to small farmers who, because of a lack of capital, farmed with antiquated implements and used backward methods.

The average wage for farm labourers in Ireland was eight pence a day. This was only a fifth of what could be obtained in the United States and those without land began to seriously consider emigrating to the New World.


The Great Famine : 1845-1849, a huge tragedy.
County Mayo was one of the counties to suffer most.

The first reports of blight appeared in September 1845. For one third of the country's population, the potato was the sole article of diet. In County Mayo it was estimated that nine tenths of the population depended on it.

For many, emigration had become a means of escape. By 1851, it is estimated that one million Irish people had died and another million had emigrated, many leaving from Mayo ports for England, America and Australia.

Over the period 1841-1851, the population of County Mayo fell by 29% from 388,887 to 274,499. Emigration became a long term legacy of the famine with each successive census showing a steady decline in the population of County Mayo to a low of 109,525 in 1971.

By the end of 1854 nearly two million people - about a quarter of the total irish population - had emigrated to the United States in ten years.
During the period 1820 and 1920 over 4,400,000 people emigrated from Ireland to the United States.
In 1840 Ireland had been the most densely populated country in Europe. By the 20th century this situation had been completely reversed.

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Viewed: 1901
Points: 2
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Additional Photos by Jean Renaud Leborgne (jrleborgne) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 155 W: 55 N: 82] (1554)
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