Photos

Photographer's Note

LOOK THE *WS1*
*WS2*
TOO

Η αρχαία αγορά της Αθήνας βρίσκεται βορειοδυτικά της Ακρόπολης. Ήταν το διοικητικό, φιλοσοφικό, εκπαιδευτικό, κοινωνικό και οικονομικό κέντρο της πόλης. Ήταν χώρος κατοικίας και ταφής από την προιστορική εποχή (3000 π.Χ) και απέκτησε την μετέπειτη χρήση του δημόσιου χώρου από τον έκτο αιώνα και ύστερα. Η παρακμή της ήρθε από τις επιδρομές και τη λεηλασία σλάβικών φύλων κατά τον 4ο και 6ο αιώνα.Η αρχαία αγορά ξεκίνησε ως σημείο συγκέντρωσης από την εποχή του Σόλωνα και σιγά σιγά άρχιζαν να κτίζονται σταδιακά διάφορα κτήρια και ναοί. Στην ακμή της συνδέθηκε με την Οδό Παναθηναίων αργότερα, το δρόμο που ανέβαινε στο λόφο της Ακρόπολης. Λεηλατήθηκε το 86 π.Χ. από τους Ρωμαίους και το 267 μ.Χ. από τους Ερούλους.


The agora in Athens had private housing, until it was reorganized by Peisistratus in the 6th century BC. Although he may have lived on the agora himself, he removed the other houses, closed wells, and made it the centre of Athenian government. He also built a drainage system, fountains and a temple to the Olympian gods. Cimon later improved the agora by constructing new buildings and planting trees. In the 5th century BC there were temples constructed to Hephaestus, Zeus and Apollo.

The Areopagus and the assembly of all citizens met elsewhere in Athens, but some public meetings, such as those to discuss ostracism, were held in the agora. Beginning in the period of the radical democracy (after 509 BC), the Boule, or city council, the Prytaneis, or presidents of the council, and the Archons, or magistrates, all met in the agora. The law courts were located there, and any citizen who happened to be in the agora when a case was being heard, could be forced to serve as a juror; the Scythian archers, a kind of mercenary police force, often wandered the agora specifically looking for jurors.

The agora in Athens again became a residential area during Roman and Byzantine times.

Photo Information
Viewed: 1959
Points: 30
Discussions
  • None
Additional Photos by NICK IFANTIS (ifanik) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1824 W: 52 N: 3687] (21679)
View More Pictures
explore TREKEARTH