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Photographer's Note

Looking at this lioness (and later her companions) stalking their prey, a poem by William Blake came to my mind and similar ideas- especially why did a merciful creator create carnivores and especially when one sees the constant fear in the eyes of the potential victims.(See workshop.)
Please substitute the tiger for the lion(ess)in the poem.

The Gnostics and Zoroastrians were toying with the dual aspect of the creator to explain the suffering in the world. Dostoevsky's Ivan in The Brothers Karamazov returned the ticket back to God in anger, declaring that even if it all makes sense in the afterlife, here and now he decides to make a stand against a flawed creation.

Under the African sun and amongst "the raw in tooth and claw", the mind begins to ramble.

Back to the photo- the ladies do all the hard work. I shall post in workshop the contribution by the male. The King of the Jungle? More like The King of Sloth.Please see the second workshop.



William Blake. 1757–1827

489. The Tiger

TIGER, tiger, burning bright
In the forests of the night,
What immortal hand or eye
Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

In what distant deeps or skies 5
Burnt the fire of thine eyes?
On what wings dare he aspire?
What the hand dare seize the fire?

And what shoulder and what art
Could twist the sinews of thy heart? 10
And when thy heart began to beat,
What dread hand and what dread feet?

What the hammer? what the chain?
In what furnace was thy brain?
What the anvil? What dread grasp 15
Dare its deadly terrors clasp?

When the stars threw down their spears,
And water'd heaven with their tears,
Did He smile His work to see?
Did He who made the lamb make thee? 20

Tiger, tiger, burning bright
In the forests of the night,
What immortal hand or eye
Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?

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Additional Photos by Klaudio Branko Dadich (daddo) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 3581 W: 114 N: 6351] (28698)
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