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Great holmertz 2021-06-13 6:35

Hello Kasia,
Thank you very much for the dedication. It's a nice gift. ;-) I could have too many bananas, I only eat them for emergencies. But looking at them, and a mountain of guavas, is always a pleasure. I really like the rather typical Indian background too. In the WS I notice the shop offering plane and bus tickets. You wouldn't have found that kind of travel agency in Agra or anywhere else a few decades ago, when buying any kind of tickets was a very complicated matter.
Kind regards,
Gert

  #11  
Old 06-20-2021, 07:43 PM
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Hi Kasia & friends,

Kasia wrote that it might not be wise to lie to US immigration.
Do you mean both at the airport and when applying for the ESTA (Electronic System for Travel Authorization to the USA)?

Even when you've never had a stamp of the relevant country in your passport?

I don't know if the following is true...
A European who has been to the USA many times told me that the American security services have lists of all passengers on the international flights of most airlines.
It would make no sense to fly to Iran with a well known airline and to conceal it for US security.
BTW, on the ESTA form you can read that lying will not allow you to visit the USA.

Someone with paranoid personality disorder? Or possible reality?

Paul
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  #12  
Old 06-20-2021, 10:29 PM
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emka emka is offline
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Is Ukraine International Airlines a well-known airline?
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  #13  
Old 06-21-2021, 01:09 PM
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Default Booking transport in India

I think UIA does classify as a well-known airline. Not just because I flew it more than once... :-) Anything that flies to Heathrow has to be considered as a big carrier.
I do believe US security can infiltrate systems and intercept data worldwide. We've had many proofs of that process in the recent history. Echelon is just one example. Abducting people and placing them in secret facilities in the US is another. I boarded the plane to Iran in the UK, so it's practically guaranteed that, if it's true they operate such a programme, they have details regarding my trip. They would have to be able to obtain more than just names however. Imagine them just getting hold of my name... The first question would be: "how many of you are there in bloody Poland???". For Gert and Paul - mine is the combination of the most popular surname and one of the most popular first names in Poland. I personally knew 2 more KN's (one of them was a pen pal - we started exchanging letters because of our names; the other one - my grandmother). There is another photographer in the UK called Kasia Nowak (she does wedding photography). I could go on and on...
I'm also a citizen of more than one country and, consequently, own two passports. No idea if that would help though.
So anyway. I wouldn't mind if I was turned down at the ESTA stage. I would be more worried about getting arrested after I've landed in a US airport. I don't know the exact rules, but I also realise that international law, such as the Geneva convention, doesn't apply to the US and that rules will be interpreted there and then, on case by case basis.
Nevertheless, against to what I've said, I think I'll try one day. I've been reading on Alaska and it has just landed on my travel wish list.
As for your question, Malgo, how would the Burmese officialdom know that my photo had been taken more than three months earlier - digital photos carry info on the date when they were taken, don't they. I think that data can be removed, but I'm not sure how sure that removal is. But then again, I don't think they would have even noticed!
First day of the astronomical summer... 15 degrees Celsius and rain all day in London. Pah!
Malgo - can we swap??? ;-)
Have a nice week All.
Kasia
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  #14  
Old 06-21-2021, 07:54 PM
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Don't the airlines know the birth dates of their passengers?
In that case also the American security services.
That would reduce the number of KN's.

Anyway, you three cannot possibly list all the countries you have visited on your application form. You should add an extensive appendix which I don't think is possible.

The ESTA authorization is valid for two years.
Consequently, after the approval, one can quickly go to Iran, or North Korea or any other interesting country in the world that the Americans are not so keen on.
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  #15  
Old 06-21-2021, 08:59 PM
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Hi All,

I like experiments, so I tried to apply for ESTA, without submitting, of course.


Double citizenship and passport don't help:

Are you currently a citizen or national of any other country? *
Yes
No
?
In the past have you ever been a citizen or national of any other country? *
Yes
No
?
Have you ever been issued a passport or national identity card for travel by any other country? *
Yes
No

And also this:
Have you traveled to, or been present in Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia, Yemen or North Korea on or after March 1, 2011? *

Not only Iran, but also Syria .
No Mississippi cruise or Amtrak travel for me.
M
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  #16  
Old 06-22-2021, 01:05 PM
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Hi Malgo,


The Americans are cunning, of course.

If you report that you have visited one of those countries, you are invited to contact the American embassy in your country.
That's how a compatriot of mine fared. However, she had only visited Iran.
I wonder what happens when you report that you have visited all these countries I'm thinking of one of the many KN's who wants to go to Alaska in a few years.

At the embassy you have a friendly conversation and they assure you that you can go to the USA. People of the American embassadies are very friendly. Really.
You can certainly still go, but prepare yourself for extra interest from the security services at the airport (of arrival).
Your Mississippi cruise or your Amtrak trip gets a slightly livelier intro.

Best regards,
Paul
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  #17  
Old 06-22-2021, 01:13 PM
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PS for Malgo:
The question was whether you traveled to those countries AFTER March 1, 2011. Didn't you leave Syria just in time?
Without a time limit I would come to three countries. But all three date back to well before 2011.
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  #18  
Old 06-22-2021, 02:17 PM
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Yes! I was in Syria in 2010 . I have read, that this limitation is for a visa-free visit. (Visa Waiver Programme) One can apply for a visa, but it is expensive. Anyway, these are only theoretical considerations. I have visited 22 states of the USA so it is not a problem. And there is another dream cruise that I would like to go - from Yaroslavl to Astrakhan.
Cheers
M
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  #19  
Old 06-22-2021, 05:43 PM
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Hello all,
This now very long thread looks addressed to me, so I should get involved again. ;-
The Americans have good memories, and when they've decided they don't like you, they stick to that.
At least judging from what happened to the son of friends of mine. He plays lead guitar in a heavy metal hard rock band that received an invitation to play in a festival somewhere in the US. But they were refused clearance to go, because there were already so many similar bands in the US, so "there was no need to grant a work permit to a Swedish band".
A year later this young man planned to pay a short visit to California with his girlfriend on their way to his sister's Mexican mother-in-laws's birthday party somewhere in Mexico. But he was again refused entry to the US, with a reference to the earlier denial. It didn't matter that he was not going to take the job away from any unemployed American guitar player. And there's no arguing with US officials.
Gert
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  #20  
Old 06-27-2021, 09:19 PM
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Default Booking transport in India

I needed a special appendix to list all my trips in just the previous 5 years when I was submitting my Brit citizenship application. :-D However, against what Paul thinks, I have not been to all the "forbidden" countries. Only Iran, Iraq and North Korea. I'm planning to go to Yemen and Sudan (peaceful parts of those countries, like my trip to Afghanistan) sometime soon and to Syria one day. So no Alaska for me I guess.
Lots of countries ask that question about other citizenships/passports. It's often prudent and totally safe to lie, if only to pay less for the visa. But, as I mentioned before, I think I would be too freaked out to lie to US immigration.
Having said that... Until some 5 years ago, US citizens used to lie to their own immigration office regarding their trips to Cuba. They would fly to Canada or Jamaica, and from there to Havana. They would get a Cuba visa on a piece of paper (I know, as I travelled to Cuba in 2009) that would then be confiscated by Cuban immigration on departure. Ah, those were the days...
Maybe I should just try - apply and be open about my travel history. I would then have something to report back to you. :-D
Have a nice new week.
Kasia
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