Burnt out highlights with Canon 350D

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  • Re: Burnt out highlights with Canon 350D
    Thanks Herve, I have done that (set the exposure down 2/3 stop).
    I, too, am surprised I haven't read much about the burnt out whites in the reviews. My Pentax Optio 555, a point and shoot camera, is much, much better in that respect. Am looking forward to shooting RAW to see what that will do to the pic.
    Raluca
  • Re: Burnt out highlights with Canon 350D
    Hi Adrian,
    I'm away at the moment and can't process pics so as to post them on the site. I can assure you some of them are bad. Next week I will probably post some which are only affected in small measure, and will try to remember to post the EXIF data as you suggest.
    Thanks a lot!
    Raluca
  • Re: Burnt out highlights with Canon 350D
    Hi Linas,
    What you write sounds extremely interesting. What RAW converter do you use? Sounds like Photoshop doesn't do it. I will have to look at the software which came with the camera. There's ArcSoft Photo Studio (which I haven't installed) and a Digital Photo Professional which doesn't seem to do much!
    Thanks a lot,
    Raluca
  • Re: Burnt out highlights with Canon 350D
    Hi Raluca,
    I would not go for software as a medium for all "bad" pictures. Try to use the camera and its capabilities rather then "produce" pictures with computer software. Only then you will fully appreciate the magic of photography.

    "Take a picture in the RAW format and let the software "heal the wounds" errr... dead end...
    It's not the way it should be done...

    All the best and great captures...
    Regards,
    Michal
  • Re: Burnt out highlights with Canon 350D
    Yes, Raluca - it's a two-stroke operation: first you PERMANENTLY unerexpose by up to 2/3 stops, then you shoot only RAW, and the battle is half won.
  • Re: Burnt out highlights with Canon 350D
    Hi Michal,
    I've been reading about RAW files and found something along the lines of RAW being like the negative in film photography. If that's true, and given what I read it sounds like it, then both negative and darkroom work should be great.
    Of course, RAW or not, we should all be shooting great pictures to begin with. You're right...
    Thanks,
    Raluca
  • Exposure adjustment
    I'm not sure that permanant negative exposure adjustment is a good suggestion. Many professionals are suggesting exactly the opposite - slightly over-expose ("expose to the right") to increase signal to noise ratio in shadow areas of the photo. There are some good articles about exposure here or here.
  • Re: Exposure adjustment
    Well Linas we're talking here about the 350D, a camera that is very sensible in the highlights area, your first article takes examples from the 1Ds, a camera with a much different behaviour, even your 20D will be less sensible to highlights burning than a 350D despite similar captor and Digic. The true sentence about exposure is in the 2nd article:
    "The photographer must be careful not to carry the exposure too far. If too much exposure is given, the highlight details will be blown. Utilization of the histogram and the "blinkies" (when areas of the LCD screen on the camera blink to indicate areas of overexposure) will help the photographer determine the proper exposure."
    which means, when you have 255 in R, G and B, well its hopeless :-(
    To prevent this, the blinkies are a pretty good help, I must say an essential feature of the 350D !!!
  • Re: Burnt out highlights with Canon 350D
    The amount of highlight details that can be recoved from the RAW file is amazing.
    Check out this photo. I have posted photo converted from raw file with exposure adjustemnt and jpg produced by the camera (in workshop).
  • Re: Exposure adjustment
    Hello Jean-Yves,
    I see now about the 350D. I wish I had known this beforehand. In any case, there is a solution to landscapes but it involves a bit of work. I use the AEBracketing feature in burst mode and then merge the images in Photoshop as one of the articles online describes (either pointed to directly by linask, or a link in one of those). The result is nice. I have also set my camera to underexpose, so the bracketing goes on top of that.
    For the rest, moving objects and such, I still have to experiment more to get things right. The close-ups are ok though.
    Thanks,
    Raluca