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  #1  
Old 02-25-2004, 02:41 PM
luis_paulino luis_paulino is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2003
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Default Snow photos

Hello,


i want to take some snow picture. Someone can tell me the settings that i do use. CAn you tell me if there are a site where i can learn take snow shots. have you already taken snow photos?
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  #2  
Old 02-25-2004, 03:21 PM
mikhalych mikhalych is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 101
Default Re: Snow photos

A general rule when taking pictures of snow is to use positive exposure compensation (about 1 stop). Otherwise your image will look too dark. AFAIK no other recommendations.
And of course you should take some precautions to minimize cold weather influence on your camera. It was discussed already here in forum - Jack Johansson posted such recommendations.

Good luck.
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  #3  
Old 02-25-2004, 03:38 PM
greg greg is offline
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Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 393
Default Re: Snow photos

Perhaps even more than one stop. I think light meters usually assume 25% grey (is that right, Adrian?), so a white scene will be 4 times brighter (2 stops). You need to keep under but near saturation, so a bit less than this should be optimal.
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  #4  
Old 02-25-2004, 09:32 PM
AdrianW AdrianW is offline
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Default Re: Snow photos

Pretty certain it's 18%, although I'm sure I've heard a figure of 25% bandied around too... I have a feeling it might depend on the manufacturer :-)
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  #5  
Old 02-25-2004, 09:43 PM
ninadev ninadev is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 858
Default Re: Snow photos

Hi Luis,
Here is a discussion about snow shots + a link to a site concerning snow shots:
<a href=http://www.trekearth.com/read.php?f=5&t=5051&m=13830>discussion on snow<a/>
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  #6  
Old 02-28-2004, 05:58 AM
Cougar Cougar is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 65
Default Re: Snow photos

La façon la plus simple est d'utiliser un filtre polarisant, ça fonctionne a merverille, ou bien ajouter 1,3 a 1,5
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  #7  
Old 03-02-2004, 10:30 AM
padam padam is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 28
Default Re: Snow photos

I take a lot of pictures with snow and the general rule that says that we have to compensate with 1 or more stops is IMHO simply wrong with numerical cameras. I really prefer to follow what says the white meter and to compensate then with PS. The risk of burning some areas is really too high with positive compensation. I believe that this general rule dates back from the old argentic school when most of the time one wanted a good picture directly out of the box: it was much better to compensate to avoid grey snow even if sometimes some areas were overexposed. Now, with digital imaging, this is really different: IMO it is much better to follow the white meter and THEN to compensate (if needed) with PS. The dynamic range of all cameras is already small enough (as compared to the human eye) thus do not risk to loose some nice textures of snow with overcompensation.
You can find a lot of snow shots in my photos here in TE.
Happy shooting ;-))
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  #8  
Old 03-02-2004, 11:26 AM
mikhalych mikhalych is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 101
Default Re: Snow photos

Of course, the advise to use positive correction is more applicable for traditional film cameras. With digital cameras their additional features (like possibility to check the image together with its histogram right after taking shot) allow us to see the result and make necessary corrections.
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  #9  
Old 03-04-2004, 07:11 AM
kkaynm kkaynm is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 5
Default Re: Snow photos

The way i know to take shots in the snow is to use a gray card. most photo books have them. the national geographic photo guide has agray card as it's back cover. the way you use the gray card is you take you meter reading off it alone and set your camera accordingly. then, without changing a thing, take aim and shoot your photo. this way there is no math involved and you only have to carry a small piece of paper.
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