Magnum and small digital cameras

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  • Re: Magnum and small digital cameras
    Well.... you camera is just the tool. Just a tool... everything else is you, your vision, your imagination, your knowledge....
    Smaller is better sometimes. Point and shot is quick.....you are less likely to miss the scene. By the time you get out your big camera, not only you are drawing some unwanted attention to yourself you ... loose. I am not surprised by this article. I think for documentary shots - point and shoot beats all the big and heavy lenses ;-).
    cheers
    krzysztof
  • Re: Magnum and small digital cameras
    I am going to sound a slightly different chord here. Sure you are right that it is the imagination and vision that takes the photo, not the tools. But I think there is an important part that the tools play. In a certain way your favorite camera and lens, whatever that actually may be, could let your creativity flourish that may not just happen if you are even subliminally dissatisfied with your tools. This happened to me. I was taking third rate photos for years using my olympuses and pentaxes. These were great cameras and lenses, and I am sure I did what I could with them to take better photos. But the results were disappointing...one in a thousand would be worth a second look. When I changed over to a Nikon my photos became radically transformed. Perhaps one in a hundred was mentionable. I can't explain it except that I became more confident in my abilities with this tool...somewhat Rambo-like. Then I got a Leica, and immediately I experienced another boost. Now I am happy to say that I get about 1 shot in 20 or 30 to be reasonably OK. I don't know why except perhaps a confidence boost...and also here I have the best tool so there is no more excuse. Well, just some thoughts.
  • Re: Magnum and small digital cameras
    Well, of course.... !
    The better you tool is, the better chance your picture will come out right... but stilll it is just the tool. It is you who takes the picture not the camera ;-) but of course I agree that if you camera is not sufficient, no matter how good the lighting, your vision or the composition is - the picture will not be statisfactory. On the other hand, if you have the best camera out there and you don't know how you use it to your advantage ... well... it is just the same to me.

    To sum it all up.. if I personally had to choose between a great talent and a great camera -..... i'd choose the talent because I still personnally think that it will allow me to get better pictures.. even with the crappiest cameras. But that is just my opinion.

    Like everything in life - there is a 'golden middle' ;-) and finding it is probably the wisest thing to do.

    regards
    krzysztof
  • Re: Magnum and small digital cameras
    Yes, some pictures are really cool, but then Olympus has a strong marketing mechanisms... this is a good example

    Look at Shin Yoshino photo, don't seem like such a small P&S camera for me ;)

    Mário
  • Re: Magnum and small digital cameras
    I find that very interesting. ´Cause it´s neither the camera nor the photographer, but the relationship between them. The camera that makes you feel free, or confident, or inspired is not necessarily the "best camera now". Mark II wouldn´t make you shoot better photos than a FE. But that makes me worried about the ways photography is going: I´ve experiencing trouble in finding some films - say HP5+ - and photographic paper. Many people I know are selling their film cameras in order to migrate to digital systems. What about the language silver oxyde speaks? Congratulations for Alex Majoli, I´ve been following his work through Magnum for some time. But there´s still something to say about the old - but not obsolet - film.
  • Re: Magnum and small digital cameras
    I couldn't have said this better...quite the right idea!