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Photographer's Note

I have seen only once in my life a field of crimson clovers, the surrounding country had a deep red color. I stopped and took a few pictures looking for something appealing: the white butterfly was an option.

Sourcehttp://plants.usda.gov/factsheet/pdf/fs_trin3.pdf
Crimson clover, as a winter annual, is usually planted in the late summer to early fall. It can be utilized in pasture, hay, organic farming, pollinator enhancement, silage mixes, or used as a winter cover for soil protection or green manure crop for soil improvement. The leaves and stems of crimson clover resemble those of red clover, but the leaves are round-tipped with more hair on the stems and leaves. Seedlings grow rapidly from the crown forming a rosette. This rosette enlarges as weather becomes favorable. In the spring, the flower stems develop rapidly and end their growth with long, pointed conical flower heads comprised of 75 to 125 florets. Florets are a bright crimson color and open in succession from the bottom to the top.

1993 scanned slide

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Additional Photos by Claude SIMONIN (CLODO) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 2279 W: 1127 N: 2165] (29740)
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