Photos

Photographer's Note

Knowing something about our TE’s intrepid traveler and rapid shooting photographer, you can be sure that Malgorzata (emka) did substantial research as to what was worth seeing in a few days she had planned to spend in Melbourne. The day after seeing Brighton, Williamstown and St Kilda, she was keen to see the Twelve Apostles, situated 257 kilometres west of Melbourne. I suggested Ballarat and its historical goldrush park and gold museum or Puffing Billy in the Dandenong Hills- but her eyes lit up at the mention of the Twelve.
The morning we set out for Port Campbell National Park, the weather forecast promised to offer the usual fare in this part of the world in autumn: hail, rain, blustery winds and maybe glimpses of sun.
As we got closer to our destination, driving along the Great Ocean Road, the sky began to show patches of blue which kept increasing in size. In fact, we were treated to a sunny day (more or less) but a very windy one. Whilst photographing the stacks we had difficulty in keeping the camera steady as it felt that we were pushed at the back by a sumo wrestler. The periods of sunshine were perhaps granted to our Polish friends because the former Pope was a Pole.

Limestone cliffs

Created by constant erosion of the limestone cliffs of the mainland beginning 10-20 million years ago, the stormy Southern Ocean and blasting winds gradually eroded the softer limestone, forming caves in the cliffs which eventually formed arches. When the arches collapsed, the stacks were formed up to 45 metres high. The erosion caused by the waves, wind and rain means that these stacks are doomed to fall in due time. Some have already disappeared in my lifetime. The erosion at the base is estimated to be about 2cms per year.

As we walked along the tracks provided, we could see caves being formed along the jutting mainland, no doubt the beginnings of new arches and the whole process which will lead to more isolated stacks.

I think that these two stacks, on the other side of the so called 12, are named Gog and MaGog.

Photo Information
  • Copyright: Klaudio Branko Dadich (daddo) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 3034 W: 103 N: 5269] (23583)
  • Genre: Places
  • Medium: Color
  • Date Taken: 2013-05-01
  • Categories: Nature
  • Exposure: f/11, 1/320 seconds
  • More Photo Info: view
  • Photo Version: Original Version
  • Date Submitted: 2013-05-03 21:10
Viewed: 1381
Points: 78
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Additional Photos by Klaudio Branko Dadich (daddo) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 3034 W: 103 N: 5269] (23583)
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