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Photographer's Note

White Caps and a fierce wind blowing straight up from the Antarctic, just two days ago at the mouth of the Werribee River. I thought the fisherman was intrepid enough, standing out there on the floating pontoon jetty as the waves lifted it up and down, but then his daughter came out to play and seemed not at all bothered by the conditions, despite her seemingly inappropriate clothing!

I had set out with Santo, Alfred, Steve, Klaudio and Klaudio's brother-in-law on Sunday, with Point Cook Wetlands as our destination. Finding it closed, we drove through market garden territory - fields of red earth planted out with cabbage and cauliflower - to the mouth of the Werribee River, a place none of us had seen before, despite being only 30km from Melbourne. The Spring squalls and light rain abated as evening loomed, and the light became good for photography despite the bitterly cold wind.

The Werribee River flows about 100 kilometres across a flat basalt plain into Port Phillip Bay. The first English explorers to find the river, Hume and Hovell in 1824, had decided to call it the Ex, but one of the indigenous men in the expedition- a Kulin tribesman - said that its aboriginal name was 'Weariby Yallock' (a 'yallock' being a stream), meaning 'spine' or 'backbone'. The spelling changed later.

For those interested in the map view I've placed the locator at the spot where the man was fishing. The patchwork of vegetable fields can be clearly seen. They are most likely irrigated by recycled water from the Werribee sewerage treatment works - the dark area on the map slightly south-west of the locator.

Higher resolution photo (1200 x 800 pixels) can be seen HERE

daddo, snunney, Royaldevon, ktanska, adores, tyro, COSTANTINO has marked this note useful

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Additional Photos by Andrew McRae (macondo) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 2872 W: 101 N: 4806] (18595)
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