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Photographer's Note

I was gone for 5 days and the main reason is because I want to see the only work of Santiago Calatrava, here in California. So despite the 103F temperature in Redding, I drove north to Shasta County.

The Sundial Bridge at Turtle Bay crosses the Sacramento River in the heart of Redding, California. It opened July 4, 2004, the bridge links the north and south campuses of Turtle Bay Exploration Park and serves as a new downtown entrance for Redding's extensive Sacramento River Trail system.

The bridge celebrates human creativity and ingenuity, important themes of the 300 acre Turtle Bay Exploration Park. The steel, glass, and granite span evokes a sense of weightlessness and the translucent, non-skid decking provides for spectacular viewing at night. The bridge is also environmentally sensitive to its river setting. The tall pylon and cable stays allow the bridge to avoid the nearby salmon-spawning habitat ¬ there are no supports in the water ¬ while encouraging public appreciation for the river. Plazas are situated at both ends of the bridge for public use; the north-side plaza stretches to the water allowing patron¹s to sit at the river¹s edge.

In addition to being a functional work of art, the Sundial Bridge is a technical marvel as well. The cable-stayed structure has an inclined, 217 foot pylon constructed of 580 tons of steel. The deck is made up of 200 tons of glass and granite and is supported by more than 4,300 feet of cable. The structure is stabilized by a steel truss, and rests on a foundation of more than 115 tons of steel and 1,900 cubic yards of concrete. The McConnell Foundation, a private, independent foundation established in Redding in 1964, funded the majority of the bridge's $23 million cost.

The Spanish architect and engineer Santiago Calatrava conceived the Sundial Bridge's unusual design, his first free-standing bridge in the United States. Calatrava has built bridges, airports, rail terminals, stadiums, and other structures around the world. His notable designs include the new PATH transportation terminal at the World Trade Center site in New York City and several projects at the 2004 Olympic Games in
Athens, Greece.

Excerpt from http://www.turtlebay.org/sundial/sundial.shtml.

In my honest opinion this bridge looks like a copy of the bridge in Seville, Spain but in smaller scale, with only one pylon and one row of cables.

Another picture in B&W is shown in the Work Shop.

PP Work: Adjusted levels control; Increased saturation +6; Sharpened with USM; Cropped.

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Additional Photos by Andre Salvador (erdna) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 749 W: 81 N: 1094] (5711)
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