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Photographer's Note

The 120 foot (37 meter) long Whites Covered Bridge is a bit up stream, on the Flat River, from the Fallasburg Covered Bridge. It was built in 1867 by Jared Brezee who also built the Fallasburg Bridge. The name comes from the White family which was a prominent family among the early settlers in the area. The area had been a crossing point long before the first bridge was built here in 1840.

This bridge, like the other, used the Brown Truss design. The Brown Truss design uses an "X" pattern of construction but unlike other bridges the Brown design uses lighter and less wood. The parts are secured by wooden pegs and square iron nails. A difference from the Fallasburg Bridge is that the cost here was $1700 opposed to the $1500.

This is one of three covered bridges still remaining in Michigan that are open to traffic. The
Fallasburg Bridge down stream is another one. I'm not exactly sure which covered bridge is the third one.

Covered bridges were a common sight throughout the United States in the 19th century. As the new nation expanded rapidly westward lines of communication needed to be rapidly and economically built. Because forests covered much of the eastern part of the continent wood was the material of choice. It was cheap, located everywhere and easy to work with. But wooden bridges suffered from rot and weathering. So to keep the structures of bridges protected they were covered with roofs and siding. And so covered bridges came about.

I was about to name my previous photo "The Bridges of Kent County" based on the book/film "The Bridges of Madison County". And since so many made that connection despite my other title I decided to go ahead and give this one that name. And it shows the widespread use of covered bridges. From Kent County, Michigan, to Madison County, Iowa, some 600 miles (1000 km) away.

And another thing was that this bridge has had a stop sign and weight limit sign placed in an undesirable spot at the entrance. In the
workshop I have a second view that minimizes the signs but does not offer the perspective or backdrop that I like in this one.

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Additional Photos by Paul Mastrogiacomo (pamastro) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 2684 W: 166 N: 2676] (7218)
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