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Photographer's Note

High Force was formed where the River Tees crosses the Whin Sill a hard layer of igneous rock (also seen at Hadrian's Wall and other locations). The waterfall itself consists of three different types of rock. The upper band is made up of whinstone, or dolerite, a hard igneous rock which the waterfall takes a lot of time to erode. The lower section is made up of Carboniferous Limestone, a softer rock which is more easily worn away by the waterfall. Between these two layers is a thinner layer of Carboniferous sandstone, which was baked hard when the Whin Sill was molten 295 million years ago. The wearing away of rock means that the waterfall is slowly moving upstream, leaving a narrow, deep gorge in front of it. The length of the gorge is currently about 700 metres. The bedload (rocks that the river is carrying) is mainly composed of large boulders, which are rolled along the river bed. Upstream of the waterfall, the river is narrow; downstream, it widens and meanders
Ihave been in the North eaqst for nearly 5 years and have wanted to photograph these falls since coming up, it was worth the wait.

ikeharel, mirosu, Noel_Byrne, nels has marked this note useful

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Additional Photos by Chris Dyson (CPD66) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 231 W: 51 N: 79] (779)
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