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Photographer's Note

there are impressive view of the Chambord castle but not many photos from inside, except some view of the double staircase. The reason is that there is not much to see.

From Wikipedia:
The château was built to act as a hunting lodge for King François I, however the king spent barely seven weeks there in total, comprising short hunting visits. As the château had been constructed with the purpose of short stays, it was actually not practical to live there on a longer-term basis. The massive rooms, open windows and high ceilings meant heating was impractical. Similarly, as the château was not surrounded by a village or estate, there was no immediate source of food other than game. This meant that all food had to be brought with the group, typically numbering up to 2,000 people at a time.

As a result of all the above, the château was completely unfurnished during this period. All furniture, wall coverings, eating implements and so forth were brought specifically for each hunting trip, a major logistical exercise. It is for this reason that much furniture from the era was built to be disassembled to facilitate transportation. After François died of a heart attack in 1547, the château was not used for almost a century.
For more than 80 years after the death of King François I, French kings abandoned the château, allowing it to fall into decay. Finally, in 1639 King Louis XIII gave it to his brother, Gaston d'Orléans, who saved the château from ruin by carrying out much restoration work. King Louis XIV had the great keep restored and furnished the royal apartments. The king then added a 1,200-horse stable, enabling him to use the château as a hunting lodge and a place to entertain a few weeks each year. Nonetheless, Louis XIV abandoned the château in 1685.
From 1725 to 1733, Stanislas Leszczyński, the deposed King of Poland and father-in-law of King Louis XV, lived at Chambord. In 1745, as a reward for valour, the king gave the château to Maurice de Saxe, Marshal of France who installed his military regiment there. Maurice de Saxe died in 1750 and once again the colossal château sat empty for many years.

I am not sure about this shot (specially this fire extinguisher as the only furniture), but I try. Anyway, it is different view from this splendid castle :).

Noel_Byrne, papagolf21, SnapRJW, annjackman, annjackman, rigoletto has marked this note useful

Photo Information
  • Copyright: Malgorzata Kopczynska (emka) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 4840 W: 81 N: 12154] (71998)
  • Genre: Places
  • Medium: Color
  • Date Taken: 2013-09-20
  • Exposure: f/4, 1/30 seconds
  • More Photo Info: view
  • Photo Version: Original Version
  • Date Submitted: 2014-01-22 0:20
Viewed: 460
Points: 30
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Additional Photos by Malgorzata Kopczynska (emka) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 4840 W: 81 N: 12154] (71998)
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