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Photographer's Note

The De Candia Palace in Sardinia, where Mario's Family lived (his mother and his brother Carlo) is situated in via Canelles in Cagliari (see the Land Register in the Archivio di Stato, Cagliari). This house is now a part of a nuns' convent. In 1847 Mario bought for his mother an other house in the vicinity, at the bottom of Via dei Genovesi, in Cagliari's old town (Castello), where until the 16th century stood the Pisan town-walls between the Elephant and the Lion Towers. The façade was possibly designed in neoclassical style by the architect Gaetano Cima, or maybe by Mario's brother, Carlo, who had studied architecture in Turin together with Cima. On the first floor there are wide halls with some frescoes and a large terrace with scenic views of the gulf of Cagliari

Sardinia

In 1713 an Antonio Candia or di Candia or De Candia came from Torre del Greco to Alghero, Sardinia, as shipping for corals fishing. Her son Serafino di Candia or De Candia became the most important owner of coral's fleet in the town, with 245 boats in 1750[1]. The marriage certificate registry of Serafin of Candia and Teresa Simon is kept is in the archive of the Bishop of Alghero. In 1779 Serafino de Candia obtained the royal privilege and diploma with the title of Cavaliere Nobile (noble knight) and the use of don (corresponding to the British "Sir") for himself and his wife as well as all the de Candia lineage under royal seal and decrete signed by Victor Amadeus III, king of Sardinia, Chypre and Jerusalem. They were registered as nobles and part of the Savoy court of Turin; this titles were recognized passed by the Kingdom of Italy. Serafino's descendants are registered in the Golden Book of the Italian Nobility[2]. There are no documents about any connection between the old house of Candia and the De Candia of Torre del Greco and Alghero, whose nobility dates to 1779. The coats of arms are completely different, too.

From this house, who later went to Cagliari, was issued the famous tenor Mario, whose real name was Cavaliere Giovanni Matteo De Candia; Mario was considered among the most famous tenors of the 19th century.

He married[citation needed] the extraordinary opera singer Giulia Grisi. They traveled all over Europe and to United States and kept houses in Paris and Florence in Villa Salviati. They had six daughters, in the United Kingdom and in Paris. Their daughter Cecilia Pearse became a well-known writer of a biography of her father; she married in London in 1872 Godfrey Pearse Esquire.
After World War II the family was dispersed; today they are living in parts of Switzerland, Italy, France, the United Kingdom, Canada, the USA and Argentina.

Foto del palazzo De Candia e di Via Dei Genovesi
http://www.infopointcagliari.it/it/luoghi/i-luoghi-della-storia/316/palazzi-storici/163/palazzo-de-candia/377


The House of Candia (also called "Candida" in Latin) is a European dynastic house, from the seat at the Baronnie de Candé and later through their union to the Hautville or Altavilla, that traditionally had domains in Piedmont and the Kingdoms of Italy. The first family unions and lands registry were recorded by the Prevosto of Ivrea in regard to the fiefdoms of Candia Canavese and Candia Lomellina, and then by the Prince-Bishops of Geneva and their fort-castle at Chambéry-Le-Vieux under the name "Chateau de Candie", there are also registries of properties and family unions in the Piedmont recorded by the Podestà of Ivrea of their fiefdom and castle in Candia Canavese and Lomellina under the name of Castrum Kandian or Castello di Candia today known as "Castelfiorito" de Candia Canavese. They were, and continue to be considered, vassals of the head House of Savoy.
Eventually became united to the Royal House of Greece by marriage, its members relocated worldwide during and after the World War II.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Candia

Mario was born in Cagliari, Sardinia on 17 October 1810 as Giovanni Matteo De Candia; his inherited heraldic titles were Cavaliere (Knight), Nobile (Nobleman) and Don (Sir) in the Kingdom of Sardinia and subsequently the Kingdom of Italy.
His aristocratic family belonged to the Savoyard-Sardinian social elite, part of the Kingdom of Sardinia ruled by the house of Savoy.[2] His relatives were members of the Royal Court of Turin, while his father held the rank of general and was aide-de-camp to King Charles Felix of Sardinia (house of Savoy).
In order to free himself from the burdensome ancestral traditions which he had inherited, and to mitigate his father's opposition to a member of the high-born De Candia family pursuing a 'lowly' musical career, the budding singer adopted the one-word stage name of "Mario" when he made his debut on November 30, 1838.(Sometimes, however, he is referred to in print by the fuller appellation of "Giovanni Mario" and in many portraits in the Bibliothèque Nationale de Paris he is also called "Mario De Candia".)
Mario's decision to become a professional singer arose from accidental circumstances. He was 12 years old when he moved from Cagliari to Turin, where he studied at the Northern Italian city's military academy. Among his fellow students at the academy was the future Prime Minister of Italy, Camillo Cavour. While serving as a second-lieutenant in the King of Sardinia's Guards in Turin, he expressed liberal political ideas. He was required to leave Piedmont because of this, and travelled to Paris. The fugitive nobleman was made to feel welcome in Parisian salons and in the city's radical milieu. For a time he earned his living by giving fencing and riding lessons.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giovanni_Matteo_Mario

A note on the De Candia's ancestral seat

The De Candia Palace in Sardinia, where Mario's Family lived (his mother and his brother Carlo) is situated in via Canelles in Cagliari (see the Land Register in the Archivio di Stato, Cagliari). This house is now a part of a nuns' convent. In 1847 Mario bought for his mother an other house in the vicinity, at the bottom of Via dei Genovesi, in Cagliari's old town (Castello), where until the 16th century stood the Pisan town-walls between the Elephant and the Lion Towers. The façade was possibly designed in neoclassical style by the architect Gaetano Cima, or maybe by Mario's brother, Carlo, who had studied architecture in Turin together with Cima. On the first floor there are wide halls with some frescoes and a large terrace with scenic views of the gulf of Cagliari.

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Additional Photos by Gianfranco Calzarano (baddori) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1828 W: 128 N: 3302] (19157)
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