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Photographer's Note

This is a sub-standard photo, my apologies. It is a photo of a beach in Gallipoli, now named Anzac Cove. I have not posted it for its quality but for what this place represents to most Australians and New Zealanders. It is the site of the landing of ANZAC troops in Turkey during World War I on 25 April 1915.

Gallipoli became a turning a point in the histories of both our young nations. What followed has variously been described as the making of a nation, a senseless destruction of young lives, a testament to bravery, a farce, and a mistake due to incompetent military leadership. You don't have to be a military genius to see from the very topography of the place that this was not a wise place to land troops, with Turkish troops lining the cliffs above, armed with machine guns.

The campaign continued throughout the Gallipoli Pensinsula, resulting in mass slaughter and endurance of the most terrible conditions by both the ANZACS and the Turks. The campaigns of The Nek, Gabe Tepe and Lone Pine continued, again with senseless slaughter and no real gain in terms of land.

I remember watching a documentary on Lone Pine, where it described the waves of young men going "over the top" of the trench, being cut down immediately by machine gun fire. After the third wave, a commander of the Turkish forces yelled to the ANZACS "dur dur!" Stop, Stop! But the orders continued and the men did not stop.

The words of General Ataturk of the Turkish forces are very beautiful:

"Those heroes that shed blood and lost their lives…. you are now lying in the soil of a friendly country. Therefore rest in peace. There is no difference between the Johnnies and the Mehmets to us, where they lie side by side in this country of ours… you, the mothers who sent their sons from faraway countries, wipe away your tears. Your sons are now lying in our bosom and are at peace. After having lost their lives on this land, they have become our sons as well".

Three of my great-uncles are buried at Lone Pine. Another survived Gallipoli only to be killed in France the same year.

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Additional Photos by Lisa DP (delpeoples) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 5079 W: 367 N: 10613] (52289)
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