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Photographer's Note

A Very Merry Christmas to All on TrekEarth!

I am sorry that I couldn't find a photograph of Rudolph with his red nose, nor could I find a picture of a reindeer, but this is a Red Deer Stag taken during the rutting season in Scotland in October.

Apparently the 1823 poem by Clement C. Moore "A Visit from St. Nicholas" (also known as "The Night Before Christmas" or "'Twas the Night Before Christmas") is largely credited for the contemporary Christmas lore that includes the eight flying reindeer and their names. The relevant part of the poem reads:

"When, what to to my wondering eyes should appear,
but a miniature sleigh, and eight tiny rein-deer,
With a little old driver, so lively and quick,
I knew in a moment it must be St. Nick.

"More rapid than eagles his coursers they came,
And he whistled, and shouted, and call'd them by name:
"Now, Dasher! Now, Dancer! Now, Prancer, and Vixen!
"On, Comet! On, Cupid! On, Donder and Blitzen!"


But the story which included Rudolph, a reindeer with a red glowing nose, was originally written in verse by Robert L. May for the Montgomery Ward chain of American department stores in 1939 and published as a book to be given to children in the store at Christmas time.

But could Rudolph in fact have been a reindeer? The depictions of Rudolph in picture books and cartoon films do not make him look particularly like a reindeer. And I am also led to believe that male Scandinavian reindeers lose their antlers in early December so, if Rudolph was indeed a reindeer, he would have to have been a female as they lose their antlers much later in summertime.

Oh, well, it's a nice story anyway!

A Very Happy Christmas to All!

P.S. I've posted a full-size image of this deer as a workshop.

Romano46, mikebottomley, jcpix, SnapRJW, jhm, saxo042, annjackman, ourania has marked this note useful

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Additional Photos by John Cannon (tyro) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1197 W: 387 N: 4274] (17250)
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