Photos

Photographer's Note

Now that all of Europe seems to be sweltering in a heat-wave, I thought this picture would be appropriate - this little MG sportscar would be just the thing for enjoying the hot sunny weather. This one was captured in the lovely town of Ludlow during a wonderful TE meeting in Shropshire last year.

The MG Car Company got its name from "Morris Garages", a dealer of Morris cars in Oxford which began producing its own customised versions to the designs of Cecil Kimber, who had joined the Morris Car Company as its sales manager in 1921. He was promoted to general manager in 1922, a position he held until 1941 when he fell out with William Morris (Lord Nuffield) over procuring wartime work. Kimber died in 1945 in a railway accident.

MG produced sporting versions of Morris cars in the late 1920s and in the 1930s started making the MG "Midget" series which were popular sporty two-seater motorcars and which continued in production after World War II. Eventually merging with the British Motor Corporation and then to the strike-ridden and turbulent British Leyland, the marque then passed to the MG Rover group in May 2000, when BMW "broke up" the Rover Group. This arrangement saw the return of MG badges on sportier Rover-based cars, and a revised MG F model, known as the MG TF, launched in 2002. However, all production ceased in April 2005 when MG Rover went into administration.

This is an MG "Midget" dating from around 1973. These were small two-seater sportscars but they were not fast by modern standards, being fitted with a 1275cc engine which produced only 65 hp (48 kW) at 6000 rpm. But they were fairly reliable, they looked sporty and they were economical. Nowadays most cars like this are owned by elderly enthusiasts who, like me, continue to dream of eternal youth!

Photo Information
Viewed: 671
Points: 36
Discussions
Additional Photos by John Cannon (tyro) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1268 W: 393 N: 4697] (18904)
View More Pictures
explore TREKEARTH