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Taken in a field nearby Banbury-

Once considered a specialty crop in Canada, canola has become a major North American cash crop. Canada and the United States produce between 7 and 10 million tonnes of canola seed per year. Annual Canadian exports total 3 to 4 million tonnes of the seed, 800,000 tonnes of canola oil and 1 million tonnes of canola meal. The United States is a net consumer of canola oil. The major customers of canola seed are Japan, Mexico, China and Pakistan, while the bulk of canola oil and meal goes to the United States, with smaller amounts shipped to Mexico, China, and Europe. World production of rapeseed oil in the 2002–2003 season was about 14 million metric tons.[9] In the 2010-2011 season, world production is estimated to be at 58.4 million tonnes.[10]

Canola was developed through conventional plant breeding from rapeseed, an oilseed plant already used in ancient civilization. The word “rape” in rapeseed comes from the Latin word “rapum,” meaning turnip. Turnip, rutabaga, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, mustard and many other vegetables are related to the two canola varieties commonly grown, which are cultivars of Brassica napus and Brassica rapa. The negative associations due to the homonym “rape” resulted in creation of the more marketing-friendly name “canola.” The change in name also serves to distinguish it from regular rapeseed oil, which has much higher erucic acid content.

Hundreds of years ago, Asians and Europeans used rapeseed oil in lamps. The Chinese and Indians used a form of canola oil that was unrefined (natural).[11] As time progressed, people employed it as a cooking oil and added it to foods. Its use was limited until the development of steam power, when machinists found rapeseed oil clung to water- or steam-washed metal surfaces better than other lubricants. World War II saw high demand for the oil as a lubricant for the rapidly increasing number of steam engines in naval and merchant ships. When the war blocked European and Asian sources of rapeseed oil, a critical shortage developed and Canada began to expand its limited rapeseed production.

Photo Information
  • Copyright: Rich Beghin (Ricx) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1001 W: 51 N: 2900] (13489)
  • Genre: Places
  • Medium: Color
  • Date Taken: 2011-04-16
  • Categories: Nature
  • Exposure: f/8, 1/25 seconds
  • More Photo Info: view
  • Photo Version: Original Version
  • Date Submitted: 2011-04-18 15:14
Viewed: 2711
Points: 34
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Additional Photos by Rich Beghin (Ricx) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1001 W: 51 N: 2900] (13489)
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