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30,Saint Mary Axe (widely known informally as "the Gherkin" and previously the Swiss Re Building) is a skyscraper in London's main financial district, the City of London, completed in December 2003 and opened in April 2004. With 41 floors, the tower is 180 metres (591 ft) tall and stands on a street called St. Mary Axe, on the former site of the Baltic Exchange, which was extensively damaged in 1992 by the explosion of a bomb placed by the Provisional IRA.

After the plans to build the Millennium Tower were dropped, 30 St Mary Axe was designed by Norman Foster and Arup engineers, and was erected by Skanska in 2001–2003.

The building has become an iconic symbol of London and is one of the city's most widely recognised examples of contemporary architecture.
The building stands on the former site of the Baltic Exchange, the headquarters of a global marketplace for ship sales and shipping information. On 10 April 1992 the Provisional IRA detonated a bomb close to the Exchange, causing extensive damage to the historic building and neighbouring structures.

The United Kingdom government's statutory adviser on the historic environment, English Heritage, and the City of London governing body, the City of London Corporation, were keen that any redevelopment must restore the building's old façade onto St. Mary Axe. The Exchange Hall was a celebrated fixture of the ship trading company.

After English Heritage later discovered the damage was far more severe than previously thought, they stopped insisting on full restoration, albeit over the objections of the architectural conservationists who favoured reconstruction. Baltic Exchange sold the land to Trafalgar House in 1995. Most of the remaining structures on the site were then carefully dismantled, the interior of Exchange Hall and the façade were preserved, hoping for a reconstruction of the building in the future. The architectural salvage, its eventual sale for £800,000 and move to Tallinn awaiting reconstruction as the centrepiece of the city's commercial sector, can be seen in the Baltic Exchange listing.

In 1996, Trafalgar House submitted plans for the Millennium Tower, a 386-metre (1,266 ft) building with more than 140,000 m2 (1,500,000 sq ft) office space, apartments, shops, restaurants and gardens. This plan was dropped after objections for being totally out-of-scale with the City of London and anticipated disruption to flight paths for both City and Heathrow airports; the revised plan for a lower tower was accepted.

The tower's topmost panoramic dome, known as the "lens", recalls the iconic glass dome that covered part of the ground floor of the Baltic Exchange.

The gherkin name was applied to the current building at least as far back as 1999, referring to that plan's highly unorthodox layout and appearance. Info Wiki.

In front of the Gherkin on this roundabout we can see a school,

The Sir John Cass Foundation is one of London's oldest and largest education charities. Founded in 1748, it supports education for young people in London through its grant programmes for individuals, schools and organisations, and its support for a number of institutions bearing Sir John Cass's name.

macjake, danos, snunney, ikeharel, Noel_Byrne, Gigidusud has marked this note useful

Photo Information
  • Copyright: Iain Richardson (RhodieIke) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 819 W: 1 N: 2616] (11512)
  • Genre: Places
  • Medium: Color
  • Date Taken: 2014-04-10
  • Categories: Architecture
  • Exposure: f/7.1, 1/320 seconds
  • More Photo Info: view
  • Photo Version: Original Version
  • Date Submitted: 2014-05-04 22:37
Viewed: 412
Points: 20
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Additional Photos by Iain Richardson (RhodieIke) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 819 W: 1 N: 2616] (11512)
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