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© 2011 - All rights reserved. The photos taken by photographer John Maenhout are registered and copyrighted. Use in any form (web, paper publication, public exposure, etc.) is strictly forbidden without the written permission of the photographer. To contact with photographer please use johnmaenhout@yahoo.com



This picture has been taken during a visit with my bike to the Netherlands, Saturday afternoon.
A new season of tulips is started, we get again beautiful colorfully fields.
I found this field between the village Aardenburg and Oostburg in the Netherlands, en completely agriculture area.
The farmer was busy the other color to remove, no red between yellow, or yellow between white.


Although tulips are often associated with the Netherlands, commercial cultivation of the flower began in the Ottoman Empire. The tulip, or lale (from Persian, lâleh) as it is also called in Iran and Turkey, is a flower indigenous to a vast area encompassing arid parts of Africa, Asia, and Europe. The word tulip, which earlier appeared in English in forms such as tulipa or tulipant, entered the language by way of French tulipe and its obsolete form tulipan or by way of Modern Latin tulīpa, from Ottoman Turkish tülbend ("muslin" or "gauze")
Tulips are indigenous to mountainous areas with temperate climates and need a period of cool dormancy, known as vernalization. They thrive in climates with long, cool springs and dry summers. Although perennials, tulip bulbs are often imported to warm-winter areas of the world from cold-winter areas, and are planted in the fall to be treated as annuals.
Tulip bulbs are typically planted around late summer and fall, in well-drained soils, normally from 4 inches (10 cm) to 8 inches (20 cm) deep, depending on the type planted. In parts of the world that do not have long cool springs and dry summers, the bulbs are often planted up to 12 inches (300 mm) deep. This provides some insulation from the heat of summer, and tends to encourage the plants to regenerate one large, floriferous bulb each year, instead of many smaller, non-blooming ones. This can extend the life of a tulip plant in warmer-winter areas by a few years, but it does not stave off degradation in bulb size and the eventual death of the plant due to the lack of verbalizations.

I hope you like it.



Canon EOS 5D Mark II
Shooting Date/Time
9/04/2011 17:16:58
Tv( Shutter Speed )
1/160
Av( Aperture Value )
20.0
ISO Speed
200
Lens
EF24-105mm f/4L IS USM
Focal Length
24.0mm
Image Size
5616x3744
Image Quality
RAW
Picture Style
Landscape

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