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The Baptistery of Parma (Italian: Battistero di Parma) is a religious building located next to the cathedral (out of picture here on the left) in Parma, northern Italy. Architecturally, it marks a transition between the Romanesque and Gothic styles. It is considered to be among the most important Medieval monuments in Europe.

The Baptistery was commissioned to Benedetto Antelami by the City Council of Parma in 1196. The outside of pink Verona Marble is octagonal. The inside contains sixteen arches, forming alcoves each containing a painted scene. All these are 13th and 14th century frescoes and paintings. The most striking part of the Baptistery, however, is its painted domed ceiling. Sixteen rays come out of the center of the ceiling, which each correspond to the arches.

However, problems were posed over time as the paintings were not true frescoes. The paint would start to come off the walls and would be literally hanging on. Due to this, the Baptistery had to be painstakingly consolidated and restored with syringes and spatulas.

Nowadays it functions as a museum.

Parma is a city in the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna famous for its prosciutto, cheese, architecture and surrounding countryside. It is home to the University of Parma, one of the oldest universities in the world. Parma is divided into two parts by the little stream with the same name.

It has a long history, already being a built-up area in the Bronze Age.

For those who are interested in a full history of the city, here is a link to the article on Wikipedea from which this information was taken.

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Additional Photos by Stephen Nunney (snunney) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 5901 W: 61 N: 16982] (76350)
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