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Photographer's Note

This is a picture of the solfatares in the Namafjall area (Iceland). Scenes of unforgettable nature and geology of Iceland.

Krafla is a volcanic system with a diameter of about 20 km in the north of Iceland in the Myvatn region. Its highest peak reaches up to 818 m.

The Krafla central volcano, located NE of Myvatn lake, is a topographically indistinct 10-km-wide caldera that is cut by a N-S-trending fissure system. Eruption of a rhyolitic welded tuff about 100,000 years ago was associated with formation of the caldera. Krafla has been the source of many rifting and eruptive events during the Holocene, including two in historical time, during 1724-29 and 1975-84. The prominent Hverfjall and Ludent tuff rings east of Myvatn were erupted along the 100-km-long fissure system, which extends as far as the north coast of Iceland. Iceland's renowned Myvatn lake formed during the eruption of the older Laxarhraun lava flow from the Ketildyngja shield volcano of the Fremrinamur volcanic system about 3800 years before present (BP); its present shape is constrained by the roughly 2000 years BP younger Laxarhraun lava flow from the Krafla volcanic system. The abundant pseudocraters that form a prominent part of the Myvatn landscape were created when the younger Laxarhraun lava flow entered the lake

The Krafla area also includes Námafjall, an volcanic active area with hot springs.

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Viewed: 2013
Points: 12
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Additional Photos by Michel Detay (mdetay) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 493 W: 1 N: 1025] (4865)
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