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Photographer's Note

The Temple of Hephaestus, also known as the Hephaisteion or earlier as the Theseion, is a well-preserved Greek temple. It remains standing largely as built. It is a Doric peripteral temple, and is located at the north-west side of the Agora of Athens, on top of the Agoraios Kolonos hill.
Hephaestus was the patron god of metal working and craftsmanship. There were numerous potters' workshops and metal-working shops in the vicinity of the temple, as befits the temple's honoree. Archaeological evidence suggests that there was no earlier building on the site except for a small sanctuary that was burned when the Persians occupied Athens in 480 BC. The name Theseion or Temple of Theseus was attributed to the monument under the assumption it housed the remains of the Athenian hero Theseus, brought back to the city from the island of Skyros by Kimon in 475 BC, but refuted after inscriptions from within the temple associated it firmly with Hephaestus.
The architectural sculpture is in both Pentelic and Parian marble. In the 3rd century BC trees and shrubs (pomegranates, myrtle and laurel) were planted around the temple, creating a small garden.

This is a different POV of the view I posted earlier.

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Photo Information
  • Copyright: Jenna Estelle (EstelleJ) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 53 W: 0 N: 119] (921)
  • Genre: Places
  • Medium: Color
  • Date Taken: 2012-07-00
  • Categories: Nature
  • Exposure: f/3.3
  • Photo Version: Original Version
  • Date Submitted: 2013-04-10 7:05
Viewed: 621
Points: 4
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Additional Photos by Jenna Estelle (EstelleJ) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 53 W: 0 N: 119] (921)
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