Photos

Photographer's Note

View as far as the Louvre

Sorry, I was not watching it, the good mood is needed very much! :) WS good mood only... Funny girls from Copenhagen


The Avenue des Champs-Elysées is probably the most famous avenue in the world. I took the photo from the Arc de Triomphe.

This impressive promenade stretches from the Place the la Concorde to the Place Charles de Gaulle, the site of the Arc de Triomphe. At its western end the Champs-Elysées is bordered by cinemas, theaters, cafés and luxury shops. Near the Place de la Concorde, the street is bordered by the Jardins des Champs-Elysées, beautifully arranged gardens with fountains and some grand buildings including the Grand and Petit Palais at the southern side and the Elysée at its northern side. The latter has been the residence of the French Presidents since 1873.

17th century - The Elysian Fields

In the 16th century this area was nothing but fields outside the center of Paris. In 1616 Marie de Medicis decided to create a long tree-lined path going east from the Tuileries. The route was redesigned in 1667 by renowned landscape designer André Le Nôtre as an extension of the Jardins des Tuileries. The promenade, now called 'Grande Allée du Roule' or 'Grand-Cours' had become a fashionable place but was still isolated from the city with few buildings surrounding the area. 27 Years later the promenade was renamed to 'Champs-Elysées', or Elysian Fields in English. The name was derived from Greek mythology where 'Elusia' is a place where heroes come to relax.

18th & 19th century - Further Development

In 1724 the Champs-Elysées was extended all the way to the Chaillot hill (now known as l'Etoile, the site of the Arc de Triomphe). Its current form took shape in 1838 when French architect Ignaz Hittorf - who was redesigning the Place de la Concorde - created the Jardins des Champs-Elysées. He also installed sidewalks, gas lamps and fountains. The Champs-Elysées started to attract more and more restaurants and hotels, especially after 1900 when the Paris métro line nr 1 reached the Etoile station.

Current Design

The lastest redesign of the prestigious avenue was done in 1994 by Bernard Huet. The side lanes were converted into pedestrian zones, an underground parking lot was created and new trees were planted. Cars now only occupy half the width of this grand avenue.

The Louvre

One of the largest and most visited museums in the world, and possibly the most famous of them all, the Louvre is one of Paris's many must-visits. Situated in the 1st arrondissement, in the heart of Paris, this palace is both from an architectural point of view as from an arts perspective one of the must see sights in Paris. It displays about 35,000 works of art, among them some world-famous like the Mona Lisa from Leonardo da Vinci, Venus de Milo and Winged Victory. The first time the immense collection was displayed was in 1789, during the revolution when the Revolutionary Committee decided to open the King's arts collection to the public.

History

The Louvre was built in several stages. It was first built in the sixteenth century when the Royal family started to move near the fortress of the Louvre. The original keep was then destroyed and it was replaced by a palace. The main architect was Pierre Lescot, who was appointed in 1546 by the king. The immense building had 2 courtyards and was 2 stories high. Its architecture combines French and Italian features.
About a decade later, Catherine de Medici started with another palace project, the Tuileries on the west side of the Louvre. Later, during the second empire, between 1853 and 1857, the Louvre was massively extended by Visconti and Lefuel. (Source:aviewoncities.com)

Photo Information
Viewed: 1267
Points: 34
Discussions
  • None
Additional Photos by George Rumpler (Budapestman) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 8900 W: 3 N: 20435] (82620)
View More Pictures
explore TREKEARTH