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Photographer's Note

"Potchitra".
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Patachitra is the painting usually made on tasar silk cloth. Sometimes it is also made by gluing layers of old cotton cloth with tamarind glue and chalk to create a leather like surface.
The history of 'patachitra' or scroll painting in Bengal goes back to more than two thousand years. Rural bards and story-tellers in earlier times would use these scrolls which had pictures depicting various events and themes of the stories they would tell.
The traditional colors used in the patachitra art are red, ochre, indigo, green, black and white all obtained from the natural sources like Hingula, Ramaraja, Haritala, lamp black, and shells.
The brushes are crude made of the hair of domestic animals. Usually the squirrel hairbrushes are not used but the fine brushes made from the hairs of a mongoose or rat, or the coarser brushes made from the hair of a buffalo neck. In the past, artists also used kiya plants for drawing thick lines.
The adhesive if used any for these paintings are made in tamarind seeds. The tamarind seed powder is soaked in water overnight and then boiled to provide it a gummy consistency.

Potua-s are traditional folk artists of Bengal. They belong to a very poor segment of the society. In religion they are somewhere midway between Hindus & Muslims, but more inclined to the latter. However, all draw pictures in a traditional way peculiar to them about Hindu mythology & different social issues. Their drawings are called “POT”-s or “POTCHITRA”-s.

As i shared another art from bengal in my previous post which was displayed in saraswati puja festival in my town this year.This "potchitra" is also displayed in another festival concern(locally called club or samity).

Hope you like it.Thank you.

mirosu, Mondaychild has marked this note useful

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Additional Photos by Mrityunjoy Chatterjee (mrichat) Gold Star Critiquer/Silver Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 142 W: 19 N: 232] (1649)
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