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Great tyro 2012-04-25 1:13

Hello Rosemary,

What a wonderful and well researched note you have written for us here and what a beautiful photograph - for which, I might add, you must make no apology whatsoever.

As with all good photographs, it is again the lighting which makes this one so special. The light on the elephants is just magical, "modelling" or "scultping" their forms beautifully. The dust which they are kicking up gives a real sense of the speed at which they are travelling too.

The distant light is superb also: the snow-capped mountain stands proudly through the mist yet is still perfectly seen, underlined by the row of trees and vegetation in the mnid-ground which is perfectly placed at the junction of upper and middle thirds of the composition.

Gorgeous true colours, perfect exposure and exquisite detail and sharpness.

Stunning!

Kind Regards,

John.

P.S. Another of yours to add to my "favourites"!

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Old 04-25-2012, 08:37 AM
SnapRJW SnapRJW is offline
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Default To tyro: Light ...

Hi John - I agree wrt the light but I am not terribly happy with the composition. I'm not keen that the elephants are walking out of shot but I do like the last elephant's posture and ears! In a situation like this you have to get what you can and I did think that it was important to show Kili in the BG as it is such a magical sight. Thank you for you generous critique and for adding this to your favourites.
I appreciate your critiques very much because I know that you have a keen eye and like me look for good quality in a shot. At the moment I find that the overall quality of posts on TE has taken a little dip. I think some of the v.g. photographers are taking a breather don't you?
Have a lovely day Rosemary
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Old 04-25-2012, 09:20 AM
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Default Hard work and effort...........

Hi Rosemary,

Thank you for your quick reply! In fact, I should also have mentioned in my critique your addition of a map link - again, although the roads have obviously not yet been navigated by the yellow man in his Google car, if you go into a bigger map by clicking on the muticoloured "Google" logo, the little man will show you lots of little blue dots in this area, each one representing a photograph. And you can see some pictures there of elephants and also of Kilimanjaro.

But to your point. I do have an obsessive nature (and am often told so), perhaps not a bad thing in an erstwhile surgeon, but it makes me critical (and self-critical) of pictures which are out of focus, moved, badly exposed and so on. With modern day digital cameras, even little compacts, that have autofocus, stabilisation and lots of other bells and whistles, there really is no excuse for that sort of thing unless you're taking pictures under gunfire in Syria or something like that. Such pictures just convey to me the impression that whoever took the picture really wasn't all that interested and certainly didn't put any real time or effort into taking the picture or processing it.

The same goes for notes. You obviously put a lot of time and effort into writing the notes you do and they are interesting and informative, complement your pictures and give real insight into places, people and lifestyles, particularly in Africa, where very few of us have ventured. True TE stuff, complying perfectly with the original mission of TE. But things like "an old place in a town shot somewhere near edinburg last week it was raining" are completely off-putting and give no encouragement to the viewer to go any further than just pass on to the next picture.

As with all worthwhile things in this life, I'm afraid that application and hard work are necessary to take good photographs. Taking photographs from car parks and lay-bys are not usually quite so impressive as those taken by people who have ventured more than a few yards from their car. Similarly, notes require a bit of research and effort too if they are going to be meaningful or have any interest to others.

But why am I preaching to the converted? I'm sure your feelings are very similar to mine, so I shall go away and look at some more snaps and write some in-depth critiques like "Great capture", "Good shot", "Luv the view"!

Kindest Regards,

John.

P.S.If you have the time, it would be good to put some of your pictures on "Panoramio" so that they show up on Google Earth. Some pictures there are very good but yours would certainly be up with the best. I'm afraid I've only done one - a panoramic view near Wormit in Fife - but it's quite good fun to navigate Google Earth and see it. Naturally, you have to sign up with a username for that. Unfortunately, when I did that, "tyro" wasn't available so I must confess that my username on Panoramio is very pretentious - "Fox-Talbot" - yes, definitely too pretentious! It's here and here! Actually, it's also on TE!
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Old 04-25-2012, 10:14 AM
SnapRJW SnapRJW is offline
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Default Dear Mr Fox-Talbot

..... What a marvellous name you have and I really like your shot on Panoramio. One day I might well put some work up there too! Rosemary
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Old 04-25-2012, 10:42 AM
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Default Too pretentious?

Hi Rosemary,

Thank you. I do think my username was just a tad pretentious but I couldn't think of anything else at the time.

I don't know if you've read about that great man but you can here. Also, a great friend of mine on TE, who unfortunately hasn't posted here now for some time, uploaded this wonderful picture of Fox Talbot's window in Lacock Abbey where the great man made the very first siver bromide photographic image by exposing a glass plate indoors to the light streaming through that oriel window - you can see it here.

Kind Regards,

John.
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Old 04-25-2012, 12:47 PM
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Default Study - History of Photography

Hi Again John - A million years ago when I was studying photography I did a course on the history of photography. At one stage I actually made my own photographic paper using the Gum Arabic process. I still have a couple of prints I made using 5"x4" negatives exposed under glass using the sunlight to expose the paper. Cheers R


(The historical photography process of gum bichromate photography uses gum arabic mixed with ammonium or potassium dichromate and pigment to create a coloured photographic emulsion that becomes relatively insoluble in water upon exposure to ultraviolet light. In the final print, the acacia gum permanently binds the pigments onto the paper.)
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