Forums


Go Back   The TrekEarth Forums > TrekEarth Forum Home > Photos

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-09-2012, 02:45 PM
SantisImages SantisImages is offline
TE Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 8
Default To corjan3: Bright onions

I'm too conservative with post processing. I really like way the onions came to life in your image. I love clouds, however. It is a pity one cannot produce bright onions and interesting clouds when one shoots without back light. Do you have any tricks up your sleeve perhaps?

Last edited by SantisImages; 04-09-2012 at 02:55 PM. Reason: "Please note: If this is your first visit since the change, you will need to log out from the site and re-log in to verify your identity to the forum before you can post."
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-09-2012, 09:46 PM
corjan3 corjan3 is offline
TE Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 122
Default Post-processing

Actually, one can never be too conservative with post-processing, so you have the right attitude. My approach is that I strive for ZERO PP in TN, will do some here only if necessary, and will take artist's license with PP in TL, also if necessary. Achieving the desired image within the camera is the ultimate....do you hear a voice speaking from the days of film photography and darkroom work?

Anyway....a few suggestions:

1. In a situation like this when you have a big difference in illumination between the sky and the foreground you can try pointing your camera at the sky, pressing the shutter button halfway to set the aperture and, holding it in, moving the camera in position for the shot and taking the photo. It will render the sky darker and in good exposure but may give too much of an underexposed foreground. Very often, though, you will achieve a pleasing result. Under opposite circumstances with a dark sky you could reverse the procedure.

2. Seeing that you use a tripod, which is very good for almost all reasons other than action shots, you can try High Dynamic Range recording where you set your camera for shutter-priority mode, 1/100th second say, and then take three shots...one with correct exposure, another with a one-stop underexposure and the third with a one-stop overexposure. There must, of course be NO movement during that time. You can then combine the three shots into one with post-processing (Some software packages even allow you to do that with just one picture.) You can also take five images with two stops and one stop underexposure and equal overexposure, respectively. It also is quite possible that your camera will have a setting for such image bracketing, in which case it will take the three images in quick succession and you will then not even need a tripod, except with slow shutter speed of course.

3. Your camera may have a Black and White setting (B&W will never lose its place in all kinds of photography....I do far too little of it). And it may have a "filter" setting for blue, red or yellow which are analogous to the coloured glass filters we used with B&W film photography. The red filter will render the blue of the sky pleasantly dark and leave the clouds standing out very boldly.

Once again, please forgive my generosity with advice. I just feel you live in such a photogenic part of our country and you seem to have the right approach. Best wishes.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-10-2012, 07:35 AM
SantisImages SantisImages is offline
TE Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 8
Default Thanx

hey .... thnak you man ... no advice is too much, I have much to learn
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-10-2012, 08:50 AM
danaes danaes is offline
TE Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 4
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by corjan3 View Post
Actually, one can never be too conservative with post-processing, so you have the right attitude. My approach is that I strive for ZERO PP in TN, will do some here only if necessary, and will take artist's license with PP in TL, also if necessary. Achieving the desired image within the camera is the ultimate....do you hear a voice speaking from the days of film photography and darkroom work?

Anyway....a few suggestions:

1. In a situation like this when you have a big difference in illumination between the sky and the foreground you can try pointing your camera at the sky, pressing the shutter button halfway to set the aperture and, holding it in, moving the camera in position for the shot and taking the photo. It will render the sky darker and in good exposure but may give too much of an underexposed foreground. Very often, though, you will achieve a pleasing result. Under opposite circumstances with a dark sky you could reverse the procedure.

2. Seeing that you use a tripod, which is very good for almost all reasons other than action shots, you can try High Dynamic Range recording where you set your camera for shutter-priority mode, 1/100th second say, and then take three shots...one with correct exposure, another with a one-stop underexposure and the third with a one-stop overexposure. There must, of course be NO movement during that time. You can then combine the three shots into one with post-processing (Some software packages even allow you to do that with just one picture.) You can also take five images with two stops and one stop underexposure and equal overexposure, respectively. It also is quite possible that your camera will have a setting for such image bracketing, in which case it will take the three images in quick succession and you will then not even need a tripod, except with slow shutter speed of course.

3. Your camera may have a Black and White setting (B&W will never lose its place in all kinds of photography....I do far too little of it). And it may have a "filter" setting for blue, red or yellow which are analogous to the coloured glass filters we used with B&W film photography. The red filter will render the blue of the sky pleasantly dark and leave the clouds standing out very boldly.

Once again, please forgive my generosity with advice. I just feel you live in such a photogenic part of our country and you seem to have the right approach. Best wishes.
thanks for sharing these .
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-10-2012, 08:53 AM
corjan3 corjan3 is offline
TE Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 122
Default Light meter

One last thing that I forgot to mention, but which you probably are well aware of, is that, with such high contrast conditions, the lightmeter setting should be for evaluative metering rather than spot or centre-weighted. Will leave you alone now.

PS: http://www.treknature.com/gallery/photo273199.htm is an example in TN of HDR in high contrast conditions.
Reply With Quote
 
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 10:24 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.


explore TREKEARTH