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  #11  
Old 10-27-2004, 04:45 PM
Riz Riz is offline
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Default Re: more photographers

thanks Bryan I like there work as well as there layout of the sites themselves
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  #12  
Old 10-27-2004, 07:15 PM
Luko Luko is offline
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Default Don MacCullin

Yes of course, everybody who's a bit interested into pj knows and praises James Nachtwey, he quit Magnum to set up his own photo agency who's biggest success was their photo report on 9/11 (James is also a very "lucky" photographer he was one of he first on the premises). JN can now compete with Salgado for the most illustrious contemporary PJ title... but...

...there's something behind JN's cold technique that I would like to sort out : he has come up to the summit of the photographers in a short notice, he put his whole head and camera where noone else would have put even their feet, attended every war and catastrophy manhood was offered these later years... eventually found Magnum agency too small or constrainted for him.
Salgado has come up with lifetime projects claimed out clear and that would overpass photography, something big as life that would send a message to the world (see his Migrations and Workers amazing books). I can't see that into Nachtwey's masterpiece Inferno, a collection of human horrors...

I would like to introduce who was for me the greatest war photographer (even though he's still alive, he WAS a war photographer)Don mcCullin : I like the way his life, thoughts and photography have mingled into each other.
Don was from all the conflicts in the 60's and 70's : Vietnam, Ireland, Biafra, Cambodia, Bangladesh, Middle-east... he shot some of he most symbolistic photos of the Vietnam war.

At a certain point he decided he didn't want to see violence anymore, he then traveled to the Mentawai to see the flowermen tribes, then deeper again into the heart of the world to Irian Jaya. Finally he went to India to get his share of spirituality I guess.

I went to see his exhib in Paris 3 years ago, it was very poignant to see his terribly black and dense pics. To photographers who once advised him he printed his images too dark, he replied he couldn't feel the world in an other way after all he saw. He now only shoots landscapes or charity images.

See some of his war/india/other portfolio shots here.
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  #13  
Old 10-27-2004, 07:47 PM
sohrab sohrab is offline
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Default Re: Don MacCullin

aaaah i understand mccullin's need for the darkness in his photographs :)
you're right about salgado and nachtwey , but what i really like about nachtwey is the way he went about the whole thing. he started off on photography when he was relatively older than most other big names, learning photography seeing other photographers' works , and he did all this while he was earning money driving trucks all over the states.
but what really got to me was when he went on a life magazine assignment to one of these african countries ( i think, ive forgotten the name, i guess you'll know it :)) he was asked to record his feelings for the day on some cassettes that he'd been given. but he came back with all of them being blank ; his reason being that there was so much anger in him after seeing what was happening there that he didnt want to channel all the anger, suffering and the sadness in him into his photographs

perhaps you wuld have also heard of this photographer (very famous indian war photographer) called kishore parekh. he's got some of the most powerful war images ive seen from the bangladesh war in 1971 . im in touch with his son ( also a world press photo awardee who's on the panel of judges for the next awards) swapan parekh. hardly any of his photographs are on the web, but try looking up in the "black star" website, a photo agency

lemme give you the link of another photographer i met on the road in delhi . his name is tiane doane na champassak. he's french canadian with a vietnamese name. i actually recognised his leica m6. talked ot him for 2 hours , like a kid hehehe. i dont think i gave him a chance to speak after i heard that he had just completed an assignment for the french national geographic april issue.

http://www.agencevu.com/fr/photographes/default.asp?Photographes=30

there are a few of his photographs here. high contrast hehe, most of them being fomr the kumbh mela you all might enjoy it. that reminds me.. i've to send him a mail after my exams :)

by the way luko
i love the contrast in max pam's photographs too. thanks for telling me about him
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  #14  
Old 10-27-2004, 09:35 PM
sohrab sohrab is offline
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Default Re: Don MacCullin

luko you know.........
those charity images by don mccullin are really really powerful and they mean a lot to me because thats the line i want to get into .
thanks a lot :)


p.s. just a technical question. for me the biggest strength of these photographs is the way he's captured their expressions and gazes. do you have any clue how he was able to bring their eyes out like that . it really contrats with their shiny dark skin. the eyes are absolutely white . is it the printing or have the eyes been dodged like that on the computer?
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  #15  
Old 10-27-2004, 10:03 PM
sohrab sohrab is offline
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Default Re: Don MacCullin

luko you know.........
those charity images by don mccullin are really really powerful and they mean a lot to me because thats the line i want to get into .
thanks a lot :)


p.s. just a technical question. for me the biggest strength of these photographs is the way he's captured their expressions and gazes. do you have any clue how he was able to bring their eyes out like that . it really contrats with their shiny dark skin. the eyes are absolutely white . is it the printing or have the eyes been dodged like that on the computer?
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  #16  
Old 10-28-2004, 12:29 PM
Darren Darren is offline
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Default Re: James Nachtwey

Hi Maciek. I have come across Nachtwey's stuff a few times in the past and have pretty much always had the same reaction. Initially, I am bowled over with the impact and realism of his photos. However, it doesn't take me too long to find his stuff too overwhelming. Quite honestly, his shots are almost entirely of depressing subjects and looking after sad case after sad case just is too much for me. This is not to downplay his stuff, it is exceptionally well done and tells important stories. However for me, I would rather spend time looking at shots that uplift, not depress. Even more for me, when photos taken in difficult circumstances are able to show a spark of hope or life, that is what I really appreciate.

I think Luko said it earlier. Nachtwey really does show up with a camera in spots very few others would even get close to. This is a skill and something admirable, just not something I can really appreciate all that much, especially not in large doses.
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  #17  
Old 10-28-2004, 01:09 PM
Luko Luko is offline
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Default Re: Don MacCullin

it really contrats with their shiny dark skin. the eyes are absolutely white . is it the printing or have the eyes been dodged like that on the computer?

Nowadays it's getting quite hard to see whether something was done through digital or wet darkroom.

What I can say is that Don McCullin used to (wet)print himself his images and that photographers didn't wait for PShop to get glaring white eyes.
Have you heard about "liquid light", it's the nickname of ferrocyanide chemicals? When you want to bring out more light on a silver enlargment after it was developped, you can brush the wet area with F/Cyanide. That was the trick used for more than 50 years.
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  #18  
Old 10-28-2004, 01:18 PM
Luko Luko is offline
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Default Re: James Nachtwey

You exactly elaborated my thoughts, Darren... this is why I tend to prefer Salgado who looks at people he shoots with a kind of empathy.
Nachtwey gives me the impression of a cold blooded photo technician only but I can't see the man behind.

You must have a reasonable understanding of the situation before shooting and a certain sympathy with your characters. Some images seems to be taken for photo sake only...
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  #19  
Old 10-28-2004, 04:34 PM
sohrab sohrab is offline
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Default Re: James Nachtwey

"I have been a witness, and these pictures are

my testimony. The events I have recorded should

not be forgotten and must not be repeated."

-James Nachtwey-


darren, i think his work has more to do with his emotions than his skills. to me he seems a person , who's not showing his photographs so that people can appreciate how good they are or to analyse how skillfil he is at taking them, but it transcends all that stuff on the surface.
it's very easy for you and most others to overlook all this depressing stuff, but i'm glad there are still photographers out there who believe in doing something for a cause. i dont really think he enjoys taking these photographs , but pushes himself to do it so that it can affect our bloody insensetive world in some way or the other.
i see a lot of anger and abbhorance in his photographs not only towards the issues he's documenting, but also towards the rest of us who're just busy thinking of ourselves. what i'm saying might sound very childish and naive but then again it's all very subjective.
his photographs reflect the man he is, i dont see that with greats like bresson etc ( i know a lot of you are gonna react because it seems like im belittling bresson, im not,. it's just that for me nachtwey has far stronger shots with a longer lasting impression than any of bresson's . i like bresson , but for me he's not the greatest :) ) darren and luko are right about capturing hope and happiness ,but i feel thats only one side of it and most people only get stuck only to one side which i feel is quite sad. you're right luko ... one should understand what one's capturing but how can one one understand a situation properly if one's not in that situation? from books?????????? i guess you and darren are good enough to do that.


i don't mean to be rude to darren or to luko or to all the other people who feel the same as them, his work lies very close to my heart and it's making me react like this. sorry about it, but i can't help it.

i hope you all have a happy life in your "happy world"
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  #20  
Old 10-28-2004, 04:54 PM
maciekda maciekda is offline
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Default Re: James Nachtwey

Sohrab, I agree with you here, I don't think he had fun shooting those sad photos, being so close to pain, being between strange people who were crying... I understand him, because I experience a similar situation by myself, when people are even agry at me because of my photos.. I am talking here about my pictures from the garbage dump in Phnom Penh. I had to force myself to go there, to take pictures there, it was not easy to me to be among all those poor people with my expensive camera, clean clothes... it was really hard, I tried to have smile on my face... and now, i receive very different comments from people about my pictures from that place, you can read them in my garbage dump PBASE gallery, people are people...
I admire work of James Nachtwey, I admire his courage. ...and I am not sure I would like see the things he saw
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