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Great tyro 2012-04-05 1:00

Good morning Bev,

Of course, if this bird had flown off without your getting a photograph, it would have been because you were one of the foolish virgins (Matthew Ch. 25: vv 1-13) who left her telephoto lens at home. Silly girl. And, anyway, you should have been at Church on a Sunday morning!

But the Almighty has obviously forgiven you and allowed you to come up with this fine picture which was well worth the wait. Of course, your standard lens is longer than most standard zooms and you have taken advantage of the full 70mm focal length.

The coot is perfectly placed in the frame and the reflections on the water's surface are beautiful. Fabulous colours, perfect exposure and stunning details and sharpness.

Nice reeds/rushes too - I presume you didn't find a baby in a basket down here?

Wonderful!

Kindest Regards,

John.

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Old 04-05-2012, 08:10 AM
Royaldevon Royaldevon is offline
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Default To tyro: Baby!

Dear o' dear I feel like a miscreant missing church on Sunday morning.
I'm afraid those days have long gone!
I feel more at peace with the world quietly watching Nature.
Oh, and of course, I forgot to add, that later we walked to the village pub and had a fabulous lunch. I couldn't look for a baby, it wouldn't have enjoyed 'Hunter's Chicken' and pobbies is not on the menu!

Has the snow gone now?
One of our neighbours got stuck in a drift and couldn't get to work until the afternoon! Glad to say here, it has all gone now!

Have a great day,
Bev :-)
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Old 04-05-2012, 08:38 AM
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tyro tyro is offline
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Default Now that's an interesting word............!

Hi Bev,

Thank you for your quick reply.

It sounds like you had a wonderful Sunday, especially polishing the morning off with a fine lunch.

Now, what exactly is "pobbies"? Is that the same as "pudding"? I ask that because I spent the first 10 years or so of my life in Wallasey, Cheshire - not that far from Lancashire - and I remember my father (who was from there though my mother was Scottish) talking about "pobs", sometimes telling me to "eat up your pobs". I had the impression that "pobs" was the name for the sloppy pudding stuff (like custard, I suppose) that babies were fed on when being weaned. Is that right?

Funnily enough, just as restaurants seem to acquire newer and posher names for their dishes, there are a few places around here which have a thing called "posset" on the pudding menu - a sort of milky blancmange/custard type of thing. I always thought that also was a type of baby food and I also thought that the verb "posset" was what babies did after feeding - that sort of horrid regurgitation which they invariably do on your shoulder when you're trying to "wind" them after a feed!

Isn't life interesting?

Have a Great Easter!

John.
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Old 04-05-2012, 08:49 AM
Royaldevon Royaldevon is offline
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Smile Pobbies

Pobbies is small pieces of bread floating in warm milk. Something often given to babies, especially in poorer times. I suppose it was an introduction to solid food when trying to wean of simply milk.

Gosh, we live and learn!

Best regards,
Bev :-)
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Old 04-05-2012, 09:10 AM
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tyro tyro is offline
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Default Dialects...........

Hi Bev,

So I was at least almost right!

Sorry to keep pestering you, but I really find it amazing that in this day and age when communications and travel are so very widespread, we still have so many well preserved dialects and special words in parts of the country not that far removed from each other.

For instance, in Dundee, where I spent most of my formative years after leaving Cheshire, there is a wonderful word "cundie" which means a drain or culvert at the roadside. It apparently comes from the French "conduit". A big lorry which travels around cities with a big pipe to clear the debris from these drains is called a "cundie sooker"!

When I moved less than 100 miles to Lanarkshire, no-one had ever heard of a "cundie". But everyone spoke of "ginger" which, in Lanarkshire, is a collective term for any fizzy drink - "pop", if you will. So Coca-Cola, lemonade, ginger beer, Fanta - they are all "ginger". Crazy.

Kind Regards,

John.
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Old 04-06-2012, 06:38 AM
emka emka is offline
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Talking

I love this discussion! Good lesson of English for me. Have a nice preparation for Easter menu. I will make "mazurki" - the same word as Chopin's mazurkas - this is kind of sweets made only on Easter, and "pisanki" - the painted eggs. I am lazy so I only cook eggs in the onions outer skin and then they have nice brown colours.

happy Easter!

MAlgo
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Old 04-06-2012, 09:44 AM
Royaldevon Royaldevon is offline
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Default Easter

I wish you well, Malgo.
I have made buns with Easter eggs on top.

When the children were small, we always decorated eggs, sometimes with onion skins.

Hot cross buns are also a favourite at Easter, nice and warm with melted butter. Yummy!

Have a great Easter w/e,
Bev :-)
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